Black Stork Nest in Karula 2019

Cameras Watching over Black Storks nest
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Ari19
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Re: Black Stork Nest in Karula 2019

Post by Ari19 » August 20th, 2019, 1:31 pm

sova wrote:
August 20th, 2019, 11:31 am
20. Aug.

Thanks to Nicolas Che and luizaplus (YT Chat)
07:59
https://up.picr.de/36556112ui.jpg

https://up.picr.de/36556115xy.jpg
So cute! Here is a video of the squirrel:
https://i.imgur.com/PaP8RrC.mp4

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sova
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Post by sova » August 20th, 2019, 2:37 pm

Ari19 wrote:
August 20th, 2019, 1:31 pm
So cute! Here is a video of the squirrel:
https://i.imgur.com/PaP8RrC.mp4
TY Ari :2thumbsup:

14:34
Image

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Ari19
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Post by Ari19 » August 20th, 2019, 2:45 pm

sova wrote:
August 20th, 2019, 2:37 pm
TY Ari :2thumbsup:

14:34
https://up.picr.de/36557588xk.jpg
Sova, you have very good eyes! :thumbs: :D
Hopefully you will continue watching the nest and keeping us updated.

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Katerina
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Post by Katerina » August 20th, 2019, 5:13 pm

Ari19 wrote:
August 20th, 2019, 1:31 pm
So cute! Here is a video of the squirrel:
https://i.imgur.com/PaP8RrC.mp4
:loveshower: :headroll: :D

Ari, thank you and thank you Sova

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Post by Summi » August 20th, 2019, 6:21 pm

The nest isn't empty, though the visitors are much smaller. :D

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Post by Treia » August 20th, 2019, 6:46 pm

balistar wrote:
August 17th, 2019, 7:16 pm
Please allow me to thank you, Treia, for your kind words to all of us.
:loveshower:

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Anne7
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Post by Anne7 » August 21st, 2019, 3:06 pm

:wave:

Many thanks for all lovely pictures, comments and observations!
Trine wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 7:49 pm
"[A black stork] will pluck the feathers from one of its young and topple it from the nest, either because the chick is developing poorly, or the parent finds it laborious to feed it. Popular belief has it that this amounts to paying its tithes, or offering rent for its lodging to the owners of the farm."
Olaus Magnus, 1555
:innocent:
On May 31, Trine quoted this text from Olaus Magnus.
It is written in "A Description of the Northern Peoples", 1555, Volume 3.
Out of curiosity, I looked up the complete text and really enjoyed reading it!
Thank you, Trine!
It is surprising (and sometimes funny) to read what people knew about the Black Stork, some 500 years ago.
I like to share it with you.

Image

For members who use GT, a copyable text:
On Storks.
In the Northern countries of Götaland and Svealand, from a point of 56° elevation of the Arctic Pole in the south moving up towards 90°, only the storks with red beak and feet but with black wings are found. They return here in springtime from warm zones, or from desolate and remote fens, situated beneath more temperate skies, where they have kept themselves in retirement during the winter.
They come flying back at night in the company of cranes, seeking out their old homes once more. Since this is where they will produce their young, natural instinct prompts them to build nests in marshes rather than on men's houses. In fact, these birds are happier to live by water than on land, feeding as they do on worms, frogs, mice, fish, snakes, and the meat of other animals; yet they never eat toads. Once a stork has caught some creature, it crushes it in its beak, swallows it, and then retains it in its crop till it is sufficiently soft to descend to its stomach, from which it is regurgitated to feed the chicks.
The bird is black and possesses a very powerful beak. It fights with a passionate spirit, even to the death, on behalf of its nest and youngsters, bringing one wing in front of its leg to act as a shield. While it is rearing its brood, it will chase after eagles and any other birds of prey. If it cannot defeat or chase them off unaided, it summons other storks, so that it may win an equally-matched victory over its enemies, and having gained the upper hand, it shows its gladness by clattering with its bill. It does the same thing when its mate approaches or when its young are eating well and are thriving; then It continues the noise for some time, twisting its head backwards and forwards repeatedly. If frightened at night, it clatters and hisses, calling for help to combat harmful beasts. Moreover, it will pluck the feathers from one of its young and topple it from the nest, either because the chick is developing poorly, or the parent finds it laborious to feed it. Popular belief has it that this amounts to paying its tithes, or offering rent for its lodging to the owner of the farm.
Generally, however, its devotion towards its offspring is exceptional. So committed are storks to keeping their nests warm that they shed their plumage through continual brooding. The time they have spent in rearing their young is entirely repaid when they are nursed by their own children, for these rekindle the heat in their parents' numb limbs and attend to their meals, till strength has returned to their aged wings and they can again supply themselves with food. Both Volaterranus and Aelian tell us, on the authority of Alexander the Great, that as a reward for the care they devote to their parents, on certain Islands amid the Ocean the gods in their kindness change the storks into men. For this reason, it is considered everywhere wicked and shameful to injure them, especially in Thessaly where the number of serpents is immense. As long as storks hunt them as food, they keep the inhabitants clear of their poisonous bites, which are exceedingly dangerous. This is why storks in that locality were esteemed and given immunity, so that it was just as much a capital offence to kill one as it was to murder a man. Without doubt, these birds are upholders of moral purity, and mutually preserve the compact of marriage.
“Clearly, animals know more than we think, and think a great deal more than we know.”
— Irene Pepperberg

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Post by Trine » August 21st, 2019, 5:19 pm

Thank you, Anne! :hi:
I really find this old text intriguing. It provides so much food for thought, not only about storks but also about human nature, knowledge and history.

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sova
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Post by sova » August 21st, 2019, 6:09 pm

Thanks Trine and Anne ... it was interesting to read.

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Anne7
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Post by Anne7 » August 21st, 2019, 6:27 pm

Sova :hi:
I'm glad you liked it.
Trine wrote:
August 21st, 2019, 5:19 pm
Thank you, Anne! :hi:
I really find this old text intriguing. It provides so much food for thought, not only about storks but also about human nature, knowledge and history.
Yes, Trine. :nod: This book is indeed very fascinating.
O. Magnus writes about almost every conceivable subject. About (very old) beliefs, knowledge and practices.
I particularly like his texts about many different animals.
:wave:
“Clearly, animals know more than we think, and think a great deal more than we know.”
— Irene Pepperberg

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Post by figus » August 21st, 2019, 6:51 pm

Hi eweryone Im from Poland-watching nest in Karula all seasons.Im not write on forum because my eanglisch is not very well, but i love so much Aru Oru and I worry why no new news about them?Ihave picture of them on my desk.If I will be write on polisch be tranlate to eanglish automatic.I understand all in englisch but have problem in spelling.

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Post by juta » August 21st, 2019, 7:00 pm

Hello figus! Welcome to the forum!
All news and maps are here https://www.looduskalender.ee/forum/vie ... f=65&t=945
Don´t worry about your English, but we don´t have automatic translation. Write in English as you can, we will understand.
Proud member of SHoW (StorkaHolics of the World)

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Post by figus » August 21st, 2019, 7:02 pm

Hello once again.Ifound the translation on tablet so now it will be better with my writing in English.Im happy that Ifound this forum .

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Poliff
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Post by Poliff » August 21st, 2019, 7:17 pm

sova wrote:
August 20th, 2019, 11:31 am
20. Aug.

Image
It's a great picture. :rotf: :rotf:
Smile, you're being filmed by a hidden camera!

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Poliff
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Post by Poliff » August 21st, 2019, 7:26 pm

Anne7 wrote:
August 21st, 2019, 3:06 pm
:wave:

It is surprising (and sometimes funny) to read what people knew about the Black Stork, some 500 years ago.
I like to share it with you.
Thanks, Anne7. This is a very very funny text. Written very human, as the storks are credited with human emotions :rolleyes:
Smile, you're being filmed by a hidden camera!

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Poliff
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Post by Poliff » August 21st, 2019, 7:29 pm

A little sad in the nest.
But the soul is warmed by the knowledge that our storklets study the world.
Image
Smile, you're being filmed by a hidden camera!

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Ari19
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Post by Ari19 » August 21st, 2019, 9:17 pm

Trine & Anne7! :hi:

Thank you so much for the text by Magnus!
You cannot believe how interesting it is to me, a real goldmine.
I have a very special interest in northern literature and really enjoyed the text.

It is fascinating how accurate the description is.
Does that mean that people in 1555 spend a lot of time birdwatching?
Of course, they didn’t have tv & gadgets so they must have spent more time outside watching the birds and beasts... Fascinating.

PS. Anne7, do you happen to have access to it online?
I couldn’t find a PDF of it unfortunately. :blush:

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Ari19
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Post by Ari19 » August 21st, 2019, 9:21 pm

figus wrote:
August 21st, 2019, 7:02 pm
Hello once again.Ifound the translation on tablet so now it will be better with my writing in English.Im happy that Ifound this forum .
Figus, welcome! :hi:
:gathering:

We enjoy talking to everyone (your level of English doesn’t matter)! :D
As already mentioned, we are all at
viewtopic.php?f=65&t=945&start=5840

The storks have left the nest and we moved to a new topic where we follow them by maps. Oru and Aru have transmitters and we are looking forward to following their migration south.
They can be followed also on the official map here:
http://birdmap.5dvision.ee/EN

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Post by Anne7 » August 21st, 2019, 10:04 pm

Welcome to the forum, Figus :hi:
Poliff wrote:
August 21st, 2019, 7:26 pm
Thanks, Anne7. This is a very very funny text. Written very human, as the storks are credited with human emotions :rolleyes:
My pleasure, Poliff! :wave:
1555 is a long time ago. :-)
Ari19 wrote:
August 21st, 2019, 9:17 pm
Trine & Anne7! :hi:

Thank you so much for the text by Magnus!
...
PS. Anne7, do you happen to have access to it online?
I couldn’t find a PDF of it unfortunately. : blush:
Hi, Ari!
I don't think there are free pdf downloads available on the internet.

You can read online (only part of it?) on Google Books.
(That is where I read excerpts.)
https://books.google.be/books/about/Des ... edir_esc=y

Volume 3 is here:
https://books.google.be/books?redir_esc ... ks&f=false

It is a huge oeuvre (3 VOLUMES, each about 500-600 pages, I think :D )
https://www.amazon.com/Olaus-Magnus-Des ... 8&me=&qid=

Enjoy!
“Clearly, animals know more than we think, and think a great deal more than we know.”
— Irene Pepperberg

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Ari19
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Post by Ari19 » August 21st, 2019, 10:07 pm

Anne7 wrote:
August 21st, 2019, 10:04 pm
Hi, Ari!
I don't think there are free pdf downloads available on the internet.

You can read online (only part of it?) on Google Books.
(That is where I read excerpts.)
https://books.google.be/books/about/Des ... edir_esc=y

Volume 3 is here:
https://books.google.be/books?redir_esc ... ks&f=false

It is a huge oeuvre (3 VOLUMES, each about 500-600 pages, I think :D )
https://www.amazon.com/Olaus-Magnus-Des ... 8&me=&qid=
A huge thank you to you, Anne7! You are right, it is huge! :laugh:
Looks a good summer read! :thumbs:
Poliff wrote:
August 21st, 2019, 7:29 pm
A little sad in the nest.
But the soul is warmed by the knowledge that our storklets study the world.
Agreed, Poliff! The nest has previously been a place of joy and now has become an object of nostalgia and quietness.

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