About storks and migrating birds

Solo
Registered user
Posts: 23861
Joined: October 19th, 2015, 7:18 pm

Re: About storks and migrating birds

Post by Solo »

10.3.2020
Observing animal migration from space – ISS experiment ICARUS begins :thumbs:
https://www.dlr.de/content/en/articles/ ... egins.html
(https://www.dlr.de/content/de/artikel/n ... s_iss.html)
pica
Registered user
Posts: 274
Joined: September 14th, 2018, 6:51 pm

Post by pica »

cranes, storks and many more on their difficult trip of migration:

https://www.arte.tv/de/videos/066397-000-A/zugvoegel/ in german
https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/066397-00 ... igrateurs/ in french
balistar
Registered user
Posts: 4868
Joined: July 25th, 2017, 1:27 pm

Post by balistar »

Hundreds of thousands of migratory birds have been found dead in New Mexico


" "It's just terrible," Desmond told CNN. "The number is in the six figures. Just by looking at the scope of what we're seeing, we know this is a very large event, hundreds of thousands and maybe even millions of dead birds, and we're looking at the higher end of that."
Dead migratory birds -- which include species such as warblers, bluebirds, sparrows, blackbirds, the western wood pewee and flycatchers -- are also being found in Colorado, Texas and Mexico."
...

"One of the factors biologists believe may have contributed to the deaths of the birds is the wildfires burning in California and other Western states, which may have forced the birds into early migration before they were ready.
...
" "Birds who migrated before they were ready because of the weather might have not had enough fat to survive," Desmond said. "Some birds might have not even had the reserves to start migrating so they died in place." "
...

"Some birds might have had to change their migratory pathways, while others could have inhaled smoke and sustained lung damage.

While the fires and dry weather in New Mexico may have amplified the number of migratory bird deaths, that still leaves many questions."
...

" "We began seeing isolated mortalities in August, so something else has been going on aside the weather events and we don't know what it is. So that in itself is really troubling," she added.

The birds will be sent to the US Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory in Oregon for necropsies and to determine their cause of death, but it could take weeks to get results."


https://edition.cnn.com/2020/09/14/us/n ... index.html
Solo
Registered user
Posts: 23861
Joined: October 19th, 2015, 7:18 pm

Post by Solo »

September 21
Hello everyone :hi:
balistar wrote: September 15th, 2020, 2:08 pm Hundreds of thousands of migratory birds have been found dead in New Mexico
https://edition.cnn.com/2020/09/14/us/n ... index.html
balistar, :wave:

The data behind mysterious bird deaths in New Mexico - https://www.aba.org/the-data-behind-mys ... ew-mexico/

... these birds were starved and succumbed to hypothermia ... :bow: :cry:
balistar
Registered user
Posts: 4868
Joined: July 25th, 2017, 1:27 pm

Post by balistar »

Solo wrote: September 21st, 2020, 3:44 pm September 21
Hello everyone :hi:


balistar, :wave:

The data behind mysterious bird deaths in New Mexico - https://www.aba.org/the-data-behind-mys ... ew-mexico/

... these birds were starved and succumbed to hypothermia ... :bow: :cry:
It's just so sad....
Thank you, Solo. :wave:
Solo
Registered user
Posts: 23861
Joined: October 19th, 2015, 7:18 pm

Post by Solo »

September 23
Hello everyone :hi:

Project Icarus
Zugvögel unter Beobachtung aus dem Weltraum https://www.sueddeutsche.de/wissen/zugv ... -1.5041128
User avatar
sova
Registered user
Posts: 21865
Joined: October 14th, 2015, 7:11 pm

Post by sova »

https://www.bz-berlin.de/panorama/57-st ... uomRptiPAQ

Flown 57 hours for free! Migratory bird turns around because of bad weather


Due to adverse weather conditions, a common godwit turned around on its way to New Zealand and flew thousands of kilometers back to Alaska. The animal, whose migration is being followed by the New Zealand Department of Conservation on its leg using a radio transmitter, started in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in Alaska towards the South Pacific, the agency said on Monday.

After 2000 kilometers, however, the adult bird encountered such strong winds that it had to turn around. After a 57-hour non-stop flight, he landed back in Alaska.



The behavior is very unusual for a woodcock (Limosa lapponica) - called "Kuaka" in New Zealand - said zoology professor Phil Battley from Massey University in New Zealand. "Over the years we've tracked about 70 bogwarts that left Alaska, and this is the first we know of had to turn back due to bad weather." Other specimens that left Alaska around the same time would have it Made it to New Zealand.

Headwind? Probably not a good start
Researchers are particularly interested in what the bird will do next, how long it will rest and whether it will still make it all the way to New Zealand, according to Battley. “He still has time. He has certainly not used up all his energy, ”said the expert. "He noticed that he was facing a headwind and thought it was not a good start for a ten-day flight."


The same snipe had to struggle with strong winds last year and ended up in New Caledonia in the South Seas for a month.

"Anyone who's struggled with the same problem for two years in a row can be said to be unlucky," said Battley.

The 11,000-kilometer non-stop migration of the common woodcock is one of the longest in the bird world.
Solo
Registered user
Posts: 23861
Joined: October 19th, 2015, 7:18 pm

Post by Solo »

sova wrote: September 21st, 2021, 7:28 pm
thanx Sova, very interesting information :2thumbsup: :wave:
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 102
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

Hello everybody!
Found this on YouTube: BirdLife South Africa Channel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srsue154UaE

VABF Patrik Byholm European Honey Buzzards F2 2021

Quote:" Dr Patrik Byholm will present the recent findings from a longitudinal study on the migration ecology of European honey buzzards (Pernis apivorus). I will focus on explaining how young naive migrants learn the migration secrets and how they develop as they age. I will also discuss the conservation challenges long-distance migrants are confronted with, with illuminating examples from our GPS-tracking work."

Sadly, CABS (Committee Against Bird Slaughter) posted this yesterday (Oct 11):
https://twitter.com/CABS_REPORTS

"After travelling thousands of km on migration to sub-Saharan Africa.. how desperately sad that people think it’s ‘cool’ to blast & butcher a #HoneyBuzzard from the sky & post it online as a brag? Stricter enforcement is urgently needed to stop these incidents in #Lebanon. "
Post Reply

Return to “Stories and News”