Stories (not only) from the wildlife

Owlie
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Re: Stories (not only) from the wildlife

Post by Owlie »

sova wrote: March 8th, 2021, 7:01 pm :hi: ...
beautiful pictures
...
Sova, thank you for the pictures - a (bird) paradise indeed!
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ame
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Post by ame »

14:28 (13:28 local CET time) a bearded vulture or a lammergeier by another name, (Gypaetus barbatus), was spotted at the men's 50 km ski race in Engadin, Switzerland.
i made a screenrecording of the flight from the YLE TV broadcast and a screenshot of the video.
Image

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Post by sova »

:hi:
ame wrote: March 14th, 2021, 1:58 pm 14:28 (13:28 local CET time) a bearded vulture or a lammergeier by another name, (Gypaetus barbatus), was spotted at the men's 50 km ski race in Engadin, Switzerland.
...
Thanks Ame

Bearded vultures are beautiful ...
When someone cares more
https://www.bartgeier.ch/bartgeier-unterwegs
you can change language
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ame
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Post by ame »

this is not actually about nature but who knows if a wild animal might be seen here, too. for example a crow might fly over any minute. :whistling:

this should sooth down anyone's nerves: watching potatoes growing on a farm in Laitila, not far from Turku.
note: there's a safety net on the growing potatoes. it's to prevent the events from getting too wild. :mrgreen:
Laitila May 28 at 10:22
Image

(i'm just kidding. actually the net is there to keep the potatoes safe from frosts. they are a constant threat till mid-June)
it's best to search
vihannes laitila youtube
and select perunalive from the list.
they have also other videos on their channel, for example harvesting potatoes.
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Post by Susanne »

In the Alps, the Landesbund für Vogelschutz, Bayern, together with the Berchtesgaden National Park and the Nuremberg Zoo are preparing the release of two young Bearded Vultures (gypaetus barbatus).

https://www.lbv.de/naturschutz/arten-sc ... bartgeier/

There is a very interesting Bearded Vulture blog:
https://www.lbv.de/naturschutz/arten-sc ... eier-blog/
At the moment, they are working on the installation of the webcam-system.
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Post by ame »

Susanne, the links which you give will not open for me..? :puzzled:
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Post by Susanne »

@ame: Sorry, saw your post just now! I checked the links again, they seem to be OK. If you try the main address:

https://www.lbv.de/

the website opens with a big portrait of the bearded vulture. Maybe then it's easier for you to have access to the rest of the menu???

To all : The day, it is approaching! :loveshower: TOMORROW, the two sweeties will be released in the Alps, monitored by scientists and "bird men and women", and the cams will begin to work:

https://www.lbv.de/naturschutz/arten-sc ... er-webcam/


There is also a blog :
https://www.lbv.de/naturschutz/arten-sc ... eier-blog/

There is a short clip in the news of the Bavarian TV (Bayerischer Rundfunk), probably accessible only for viewers from Germany:

https://www.br.de/nachrichten/bayern/mi ... ng,SZocG8W

and, a little bit longer, from today's "Abendschau":03:40-6:43

https://www.br.de/mediathek/video/abend ... 0007c146b2


10-06-2021:
Live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/npv.bgd/

The two bearded vultures are female and their names are Wally and Bavaria.
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Post by balistar »

i hope this is the right thread to post this story:


Giant catfish chokes on turtle

:shock:
Image
:slap:
Image

copyright: Mathias Siebner/dpa


An American red-eared tortoise was the undoing of a large catfish in the Göttingen Kiessee. Paddlers found the predatory fish that was floating on the bank area, but still alive. The turtle's rear and legs protruded from its mouth. The prey and the hunter had dogged themselves in their agony.

"That was a stalemate. With the turtle, the catfish has probably taken over something," said Marc Stemmwedel from the Sportangelklub Göttingen e.V., describing the situation. The "Göttinger Tageblatt" and other newspapers reported on the case first.

The ornithologist Mathias Siebner was at the Kiessee on Wednesday to photograph birds. He had been made aware of the drifting catfish by paddlers. At first they tried to maneuver the catfish ashore with a paddle.

"It wasn't that easy because the fish was slippery," says Siebner. In the end, however, it was possible to hoist the catfish ashore with a rope. The animal measured a stately 1.40 meters with a weight of about 35 to 40 kilograms.

But it wasn't the size that was special, but the last catch of the predatory fish. Parts of the turtle that the catfish wanted to eat as prey hung from its mouth. When anglers looked through the gill cover, they saw that the turtle had bitten into the fish's gills. In the agony she apparently defended herself.
The fish was still twitching. "But he could no longer be saved and would not have survived," said Stemmwedel. After the fight he was already more dead than alive. Anglers finally put an end to the suffering with a targeted hit on the head.

(google-translated)

At 1.40 meters, the catfish on Wednesday was quite large, but not that huge either, because catfish can be three meters long and weigh 250 kilos. They are the largest native freshwater fish and eat fish, frogs, crabs, and sometimes a duck or rats.

Image

We could see on the SWFL-Bald Eagle nest, M15 and Harriet bringing in a lot of catfish to the nest for the eaglets.
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Post by Susanne »

https://www.4vultures.org/first-wildlife-crime-academy/


06. July 2021
Wildlife Crime Academy: using CSI and forensic science to solve wildlife crimes across 9 countries

Quote:" Last week, The Spanish Government, the Junta de Andalucía, together with an international NGO, the Vulture Conservation Foundation (VCF), implemented the Basic Course of the first-ever Wildlife Crime Academy in Spain within the scope of the BalkanDetox LIFE project. This event marked a milestone — not only did it take place during a global pandemic, but it's also the first training of its kind achieving real engagement and providing necessary skills to relevant stakeholders to effectively fight wildlife crime in several European regions. This time, a total of 34 professionals working in conservation, law enforcement and forensic science travelled from Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, the Republic of North Macedonia, Serbia and Spain to learn how to investigate wildlife crime, from Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) and forensic analysis to the final procedure at the Court."
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Post by Susanne »

https://www.presseportal.de/pm/146961/4963059
(Google translation)

Successful maiden flight of Bearded Vulture "Bavaria"
First released Bearded Vulture has left its rock niche - To be observed in the National Park in the coming weeks - Official Bearded Vulture tours
Quote: " Exactly four weeks after the Bavarian nature conservation association LBV and the Berchtesgaden National Park in Klausbachtal released the first bearded vultures over 100 years after their extinction in Germany, the first of the two young female bearded vultures left the rock niche today. "This morning Bavaria surprised us all at 5:19 am. The national park intern Sebastian from our observation team had just logged the usual morning flight exercises when Bavaria suddenly rose with a few powerful flaps like a whiz and sailed out of nowhere from the niche . Now the bearded vulture is again part of our fascinating nature in the Bavarian Alps and we are overjoyed that everything went so well, "says LBV project manager and bearded vulture expert Toni Wegscheider.The maiden flight of the young bearded vulture was unexpectedly elegant and after she even flew a turn after 100 meters, she landed out of sight in a meadow. "With the Bearded Vulture, the first excursion is not a completely sublime moment, but rather comparable to a successful big hop. Due to its size, the largest bird in the Alps cannot suddenly start sailing like the king of the air from one day to the next." , explains Wegscheider. It is only a matter of time before the second young bird starts its first flight: "Once the first bearded vulture has flown out, it has a migratory effect on the second and so Wally will soon follow suit in the next few days and Bavaria will follow", says the national park project manager Jochen Grab.You can follow Wally live via webcam atwww.lbv.de/bartgeier-webcam and on the website of the Berchtesgaden National Park. "
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Post by Owlie »

https://www.birdguides.com/news/white-t ... OFQKRiF7T8

White-tailed Eagle reintroduction scheme begins in Spain
Nine White-tailed Eagles are being housed in a special acclimatisation enclosure in the Spanish region of Asturias, having arrived from Norway as part of a new reintroduction scheme.

White-tailed Eagle is one of eight species of bird on the List of Extinct Species in Spain, which means it qualifies for an approved reintroduction project. The scheme is being led by Spanish conservation group GREFA and follows the restoration of Bearded Vulture to Asturias.

The young eagles were taken from wild nests in Norway earlier this summer and arrived at Madrid airport on 29 June, where they were collected by the GREFA team and taken for the compulsary veterinary examinations. Norway, with its healthy White-tailed Eagle population, has been a key 'exporter' of youngsters for such schemes over the years, notably including the ongoing Irish project, as well the Scottish reintroductions between 1975 and 2012.

Much like birds from the current Isle of Wight scheme, the Spanish birds have been fitted with small GPS transmitters in order to monitor their movements over the coming weeks and months.

***

The first two years of the project have been conceived as an experimental phase in which new reintroduction techniques will be tested. After this phase, an assessment will be made of the results obtained in relation to the adaptation and integration of the birds released into the wild. If the experimental phase records a positive outcome, the project will continue with the annual release of up to 20 White-tailed Eagles for at least five further years, in order to establish a future breeding population of the species in Spain.

Ernesto Carlos Álvarez Xusto, President of GREFA, said: "After more than 30 years longing for the return of White-tailed Eagle to Spain, we are facing a unique opportunity to generate positive dynamics in favour of the conservation and protection of the coasts, wetlands and forests where this majestic eagle lives, without forgetting how positive it can be for local economies to have such an emblematic and attractive species."
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Post by Owlie »

:hi:

A young Finnish rescued WTE's tours during her year with a transmitter:
[A Google map]

https://www.lintuyhdistyskuikka.net/tut ... i5QdR6sBmI
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Post by Susanne »

Original article: https://www.schwaebische.de/ueberregion ... 01518.html

Google translation: https://translate.google.com/translate? ... 01518.html

Clear-cutting in the protected area: How mighty forests are felled

Quote: "The paddles chuckle in the Raudna river. Woodpeckers drum. Somewhere an owl is calling. Mosquitoes buzz over the water, which reflects the bright summer sky. Soomaa Forest speaks many languages. When Indrek Vainu paddles silently through the wilderness of the Estonian National Park, he listens for an unknown noise in the semi-darkness of the forest.

Bears, wolves and lynxes still roam the national park. Something is moving in front of Vainus Kanu. It's a beaver. "This is her realm," says Vainu after the canoe has advanced almost silently into the forest. "You are the only one who should cut trees here.

For years, the forest activist has documented how large areas around the Soomaa National Park and in other parts of Estonia, even in protected areas, were cleared ."
If the beavers were the only ones who fell the trees in the Estonian forests, Indrek Vainu would hardly be known to anyone outside Soomaa today. Among the few locals, the dropout may be seen as an eccentric who lives withdrawn with his small family in a self-built hut.

But because he repeatedly grapples with the wood industry and politics, Vainu is now one of the most famous forest activists in the country and has been threatened several times. “People think I'm the most radical in Estonia,” he says, “I'm not. We just don't have time for politeness. "
Reforesting clear-cut areas is a farce

According to the European environmental organization FERN and Greenpeace , 1663 hectares in Natura 2000 areas and 5700 hectares of other forest areas with protection status were cleared in Estonia between 2008 and 2018, which corresponds to a total of almost the area of ​​the Kellerwald-Edersee National Park or the Hainich National Park.

The newspaper “Postimees” gives 15,000 hectares for the size of the Natura 2000 forests cleared between 2001 and 2019 alone.

According to Estonian nature conservation organizations, the intensity of deforestation has increased over the past three years. The dispute between environmentalists and the wood industry has meanwhile grown into a real cultural battle. Recently there have been repeated demonstrations in the capital Tallinn .

Indrek Vainu himself came from Tallinn to paddle in Soomaa National Park fifteen years ago. At the time, the psychologist and business IT specialist was working for a leading bank and had big career plans. But Soomaa never let go of him.

He found out that the area where he was paddling was owned by a logging company. “I made them an offer and bought the land without further ado.” In 2017, the now self-employed finally gave up his IT company and withdrew completely into the forest.

Together with other activists, Vainu works to stop the deforestation. "The authorities state that everything happens under the existing conditions," says Vainu. "In fact, hardly anyone can check that and the industry takes advantage of that."

In addition, the arguments of politicians and the timber industry to reforest the clearing areas are a farce. "You can plant a tree, but not a forest," says Vainu, certainly not an ecosystem that has grown over decades or centuries. "
Funding and reminders from the EU

While advocates justify the deforestation with the extraction of climate-friendly biomass, for which EU funding is waving, environmentalists consider this climate policy to be extremely questionable. Behind the clearing, you see pure greed for profit and the destruction of the habitat of threatened species.

Vainu accuses Scandinavian and Estonian companies like Graanul Invest, one of the largest European pellet manufacturers, and corrupt politicians of manipulating data on clearing. Several lawsuits have been filed by nature conservation associations in recent years.

In June, the European Commission asked Estonia to comply with the EU Habitat Directives, particularly when it comes to logging in Natura 2000 areas.

"It goes on anyway," says Vainu. Forests are being felled every day in protected areas, even if Marku Lamp, Deputy Secretary General of the Ministry of the Environment, denies the illegality. Vainu accuses him of promoting the interests of the pellet industry against all objections.

The activist uses his background in the IT industry to collect his own data on the deforestation and to network nature conservationists. "The Ministry of Environment's claim that Estonian laws protect our forests well is not true," says Vainu.

The latest analyzes show that areas covered by the Nature Conservation Act have almost 10,000 logging permits with a total area of ​​more than 8,000 hectares. Often there were no prescribed environmental impact assessments. “Our struggle continues,” says Vainu.
Brown bears need protected forests

In Alutaguse in northeast Estonia, Bert Rähni walks through a sparse aspen forest. “The flying squirrels love such places,” says the nature travel organizer. The rodents glide with their spreading flight membrane up to 35 meters from tree to tree. Rähni offers tours to observe the animals. "They have become very rare lately," he says. The clearing of old forests is particularly hard on the species. It is considered to be critically endangered.

Rähni has discovered a fresh bear track in the mud. There are more than 800 brown bears in Estonia. Nowhere else in Europe is there a denser population. The animals attracted many tourists before the pandemic. More than 30 tour operators and tourism companies had already written an open letter to the Ministry of the Environment in 2017.

"The ever-increasing deforestation contradicts the international image of Estonia as a country of untouched nature and protected forests," it says.
Tourists are looking for untouched nature

The situation has already become a threat for Rähni's small company NaTourEst. Especially for bear watching, he offers overnight stays in a hut in a clearing. The hiking path there leads through a dense coniferous forest. At some point he is facing a clear cut area. Chopped off tree stumps show that chainsaws were at work here not so long ago.

“It was a shock,” he says, looking at the gaping gap in the forest. “The clearing could continue almost as far as our bear hut because this is not a protected area.” But the bears still come regularly to Rähni's clearing. When the mighty animals suddenly appear on the summer nights of Alutaguse, everyone in the observation hut holds their breath.

In the meantime, Rähni has set up two more huts in another part of Alutaguse and bought 86 hectares of land. “But we only use two hectares for our activities,” he says, “the rest is left to itself.” He hopes that the Estonian forest will continue to be home to brown bears, grouse and flying squirrels. "Without them, no tourists come," he says, "they are the real value of the forest."
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Post by Birdfriend »

Thank you, Susanne, for that interesting article. The wood is in highest danger all over the world.
It's a shame.
The nature needs us not, but we need the nature
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Post by Susanne »

You're welcome, Birdfriend!
________________________
I've just come across - via one of the latest tweets by Thomas Krumenacker - something rather interesting. At the Biennale 2021 in Venice, they have a Virtual Reality Section, in short: VR expanded. One of the competing crossmedia projects is "Myriad. Where we connect".

https://myriad.earth/

Quote: "Global challenges like the destabilization of ecological systems and the massive decline in biodiversity demand a radical reconfiguration of how we understand and interact with the natural world. Interactive, immersive and science-driven storytelling can help the public better understand the complexity of our interconnected and interdependent world on a planetary scale through narratives that are both emotionally impactful and informative."
Amongst others, it's the Max-Planck-Institute for Animal Behaviour with their animal migraton data who contributed to the idea of the project.
Take a look at the clips!

They also announce a Primetime TV Documentary (no release date yet), quote:

"MYRIAD and ARD are co-producing a 52-minute international TV documentary called „The Secret Network of Animals – How Animals Help Us to Better Understand Our Planet.”
Long before the Internet connected the world, our planet developed a complex system of knowledge that united all living creatures. We call it the Internet of Animals. Scientists are only just beginning to understand how migratory animals interact with and rely on complex ecosystems to navigate vast distances and ensure their survival – and what this signifies for us humans in a shared habitat.
Can the sixth sense of animals help us to better understand our shared habitat? Can they help us to answer the crucial global questions of our time such as climate change, species extinction, natural disasters and the spread of epidemics?"

If I read the black stork migration threads, it's just about that: "Where we connect". You follow the trail of the birds, dive into the surroundings where they rest, try to get a notion of the biotopes which await them and where they try to cope with human impact, sometimes helpful - the "stowaway" BS Julge on one or two ships for example - and many times dangerous.

Sorry, I think I'm in a pensive mood today. It's almost the end of our watching season. And the happenings in the nests once more put into focus human contribution to the mess we're facing. But- but! I don't want to sound too gloomy. At the end of the Myriad-trailer the woman says: "From connection to compassion - to action."
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Post by Bea »

☼ ☼ ☼

Estonia will have a 2-Euro-coin with a new motif on it - a howling wolf in front of a spruce forest, under stars in the sky

Link to article/interview on Looduskalender main page, in Estonian language only
(I still soooo miss the English translations of all the interesting articles on LK main page *sigh*)

https://www.looduskalender.ee/n/node/6075

- - - -

Interview with Maria Meosega, whose design is the winner of the competition

Translation with help of Google Translator

- - - -

The artist of the national animal coin introduces where the ideas of the coin came from

Next Wednesday, a new 2-euro commemorative coin will be ceremoniously issued, where we will see a wolf howling under the stars against the background of a spruce forest. We are talking about the author of the coin design, a young artist Maria Meos, who has never seen a wolf in her life, but hopes to meet her someday.

- - - -

Please introduce yourself a bit - where do you come from in Estonia?
I was born and raised in Tallinn. Every free time I take my way out of the city into nature, I always find inspiration there. Whether you are walking in the woods in autumn, by the sea in summer or snowboarding in winter. I find that each season has its own charm that invites you to discover it. In the summer, my family and I have become a tradition to charge the batteries in Saaremaa. I don't think you have to drive far anywhere for an ideal holiday, but a small sauna house, a hammock between the pine trees and warm beach sand are enough.

I work in the creative agency Kontuur Leo Burnett as an artistic director, but I can be said about Hunt Kriimsilm - I only became a graphic designer a few years ago. Previously, I graduated from Tallinn University of Technology with a degree in clothing technical design and worked in the fashion industry. The visual world has always fascinated me. At one point, when I felt exhausted in the field of clothing, I decided to make a career turn and went to the Estonian Academy of Arts to study graphic design. I immediately realized that I was finally in the right place. The fact that after the first year of study I was already employed by a creative agency gave me more impetus.



Why did you decide to take part in a national coin design competition - do you always accept such challenges or did you immediately have a good idea about a wolf in relation to a specific competition?
Villu Järmut, a lecturer at EAA, encouraged me to take part in the coin competition of Eesti Pank. Some time later, I saw the press release of Eesti Pank's specially designed circulation coin design competition. When I read that the topic is the Estonian National Animal Hunt, I knew right away that I wanted to take part in it. The wolf has always been a sympathetic animal to me, and the wolf symbol has come my way before. Reading the presentation of the competition, I immediately had a definite vision of wolf coin design. This was my first time participating in a design competition, but certainly not my last.


Why did the coin depict a howling wolf and a spruce forest and night, and does the fact that 11 stars are depicted in the sky mean anything?
The primary idea was to depict the wolf in the howls, which is certainly one of the most common associations. I also wanted to depict the wolf as a silhouette, which brings out the wolf better on a small surface. When I thought of the wolf in the background, it seemed most natural to imagine a forest there. I experimented with different tree species, but the silhouette of the spruce forest, which emerged as the background of the wolf, gave the best effect. To create a mystique in the sky, I decided to add stars. In addition, placing the wolf on the ground was tested with boulders as well as with a windbreak, the last of which remained. Considering the wolf's living environment, it seemed more his own.


Was it a surprise to you that your work won? Did you see the works of others as they were?
I was very puzzled to learn that my design had won. Given that this was my first design competition, my expectations were not very high. The emotions I felt were indescribable. It is a great honor to be the designer of the € 2 circulation coin. As a bonus, with a topic close to my heart. Unfortunately, I could not see the works of others because the competition was anonymous.


Have you ever met a wolf in your life?
Unfortunately not, but I hope that I will one day be able to admire him and wish him well.


What are your thoughts for the future, can you publish any of them?
I recently started learning animation on my own, I definitely have a plan to do it further. Another area where I am currently improving myself is web design - for this I have gone back to EAA to develop myself.

Interviewer was Helen Arusoo

- - - -

I remember the times when Euro coins replaced the national currencies and how happy I was when I found my first Greek 1-Euro-coin with the Little Owl (Athene noctua) on it in my purse :D
Nature does nothing in vain (Aristoteles)
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Post by Susanne »

I just wanted to share this retweet by Wouter Vansteelant:

https://twitter.com/WMGVs/status/1449116685856825345

Wouter Vansteelant
@WMGVs
·
15. Okt.
Incredible what kind of action goes on in front of this camera trap at a pool on the Veluwe, in the Netherlands: a bathing Golden Eagle, incl. Wild Boar walking by!
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Post by Susanne »

Oct 24: Philosophical Sunday for me - maybe this article also tackles some of the questions YOU have when watching birds via webcam/in nature and/or following migration. The subject is: avian communication.

Starting point for me was the (anthropocentric) question: If, per chance, two birds of different species, Black Stork and Lesser Spotted Eagle, meet at the same place during their migration, and if both come from the same region, do they a), interact at all?, b) do they have some kind of interspecific meta code which enables them to communicate something like : "Tere! Hi, you are from my home country. Nice to meet you. You'll find frogs and mice and crickets here. Enjoy!" The latter is, of course, just some clumsy translation of human interaction (for example: tourists from the same country meeting in another country and sharing the information that you find "Schnitzel" just around the corner....). I am speaking of the Estonians Sven, LSE, and Uduu, BS, both in Crete, at least for some time, because I just found out that Uduu might have crossed the Mediterranean Sea. So, I imagined: What, if these two birds met? That was the starting point for my rather random research. I haven't found an answer yet, just a bunch of articles and studies on bird dialects, etc. But I came across this pearl of a contribution to the "Saving Earth - Encyclopedia Britannica": The Language of Hawks by George McNamee.

https://www.britannica.com/explore/savi ... e-of-hawks

This IMHO excellent article takes you back to all the questions we have about avian communication.

Quote: "Hundreds of thousands of years ago, when modern humans began to branch off from their primate kin, they developed a means of calling to one another not in the grunting language of their ape cousins, but in the language of birds, in song. Homo sapiens, as the anthropologist Frank Livingstone notes, is the only primate that can sing. And, he continues, “since singing is a simpler system than speech, with only pitch as a distinguishing feature, I suggest that he could sing long before he could talk and that singing was in fact a prerequisite to speech and hence language.” And why the language of birds, and not of crickets or leopards? Perhaps, it does not seem too far-fetched to say, because our shrewlike distant ancestors developed their intelligence in the arboreal world of the birds, so that our pop songs and Gregorian chants and arias are tracks of memory stretching back millions of years into the past. “Song is Being,” wrote Rainer Maria Rilke, more truly perhaps than even he knew: our song, our human language, recapitulates its origin with every syllable."

Another quote: "Can a hawk see in its mind its flight before it takes to the air? Can a mockingbird foresee chains of cause and effect when it presumes to correct a larger bird of prey? We know that ants and wolves alike form mental maps of the territories they traverse. We know that birds communicate real information in song. What we do not know, and what we will never discover so long as it is presumed that only we have language, is whether a bird can sing a landscape into being in its mind, whether the air above us is as dense with songlines as the desert of Australia, whether the melodious calls of warblers and nightingales convey notions of time and space."

EDIT: I have to correct myself: Sven is not a Lesser, but a Greater Spotted Eagle.
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Post by Polly »

A very interesting subject. I only have spontaneous personal thoughts with no foundation. Half-knowledge and dare memories from research that I did for other reasons.
In addition, there is the translation, which probably does not reflect everything in the way I would like to express it.

My first thought was about education in Waldorf schools. As an alternative to speech, there is singing, dancing and clapping. It's not just about conveying information, but also about your own spatial perception.
An animal will instinctively do so too. It adapts to its place.

It has been proven that urban Goshawk shout louder than Goshawk who live in the open country. Simply because the environment is noisy and noisy. It may also be passed on across generations. It takes many different persistent observations to find out whether these also differ in sounds.

It has also been observed that an alarm call in birds is not just an alarm call; if we search for and find calls on the Internet, we will often find the same tones over and over again.
However, their variations are much more complex!
A bird can even warn exactly whether a predator is approaching from the air or on the ground. And all other birds understand him, even if they are of different kinds.

Bees also communicate via flight patterns, among other things.

I suspect that animals of the same species can still be very different in appearance. Shaped by the environment in which they grew up. Characterized by parent animals. There will be strong, intrepid animals as well as fearful ones that are prone to aggression.

Dialects ... I wouldn't even rule it out.
Animals adapt well to their environment. Further north, fur and feathers are often less conspicuous. And maybe there are also differences in the sounds.
(although it's the same type)

Who knows it?
Everything is far from being figured out and until then I wouldn't consider anything impossible.
"Let nature be your teacher."
(William Wordsworth)
Polly
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Post by Polly »

https://www.vogelwarte.ch/de/vogelwarte ... d-gesaenge
Interessant sind die Luftalarmrufe, da sie bei vielen Vogelarten praktisch gleich tönen: ein langgestrecktes, leicht abfallendes «sieeh ». In diesem Fall findet offensichtlich auch eine Verständigung über Artgrenzen hinweg statt, und das ist auch sinnvoll: Amsel, Kohlmeise, Buchfink und Rohrammer (einige dieser mit sehr ähnlichen Rufen alarmierenden Arten) sind z.B. durch einen jagenden Sperber gleichermassen gefährdet, und wenn der erste Alarmruf ertönt, stürzen alle in die nächste Deckung
GT
The air alarm calls are interesting because they sound practically the same for many bird species: an elongated, slightly sloping "sieeh". In this case, there is obviously also communication across species boundaries, and that makes sense: Blackbirds, great tit, chaffinches and reed bunting (some of these species that give alarm with very similar calls) are equally endangered by a hunting sparrowhawk, for example, and when the first alarm call is given sounds, everyone rushes to the nearest cover
Die Grenze zwischen Ruf und Gesang ist nicht immer klar
GT
The line between calling and singing is not always clear
But obviously the communication also works across species.

We still need years of comparison for the dialect. :laugh:
"Let nature be your teacher."
(William Wordsworth)
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