Add a Link or an Article

A White-tailed Eagle Database Project

Moderator: maertha/felis silvestris

User avatar
Liz01
Registered user
Posts: 59469
Joined: January 21st, 2014, 2:06 pm
Location: Germany Ribnitz-Damgarten

Re: Add a Link or an Article

Post by Liz01 »

Baltic Sea News 2020-09-26
For the first time in 140 years, white tailed eagles on Hiddensee

The last evidence is from 1881.
There has been a couple on Hiddensee since last year :2thumbsup:

there are a total of 101 breeding pairs in Mecklenburg Vorpommern this year. In 2019 there were 107 breeding pairs.
there are 90 eaglets this year. :D

The largest population is at the Anklamer Stadtbruch. (It's a breeding ground for countless cormorants)
The food supply is so large there that the nests are close together so that the eagles can literally look each other in the eye. There are 12 couples in a small area.

Anklamer Stadtbruch
Image

there is now link to the article.. (Ostsee-Zeitung Ribnitz Damgarten)
Image
User avatar
Liz01
Registered user
Posts: 59469
Joined: January 21st, 2014, 2:06 pm
Location: Germany Ribnitz-Damgarten

Post by Liz01 »

TISKOVÁ ZPRÁVA DES OP Plzeň
Záchranná stanice živočichů Plzeň
6. 2. 2021
Další masakr u Velkého Boru /KT/.
Čtyři otrávení orli mořští na jednom místě!
Co to bude příště?
Pocit marnosti, vztek a beznaděj. O tomto víkendu jsme našli další čtyři otrávené mořské orly. Čtyři majestátní králové nebes s rozpětím křídel přes dva metry uhynuli v nervové křeči se zatnutými pařáty, sedící na patách s poloroztaženými křídly a skloněnou hlavou.
Pro nás jeden z nejdrastičtějších úhynů mořských orlů jsme řešili tuto sobotu (6. 2. 2021) kousek od hnojiště uprostřed ohradníkem obehnané pastviny pro skot pod Velkým Borem na Klatovsku........

https://www.facebook.com/desop.plzen/

Image


Four poisoned sea eagles in one place!
What's next?
Feeling futile, angry and hopeless. This weekend we found four more poisoned sea eagles. The four majestic kings of heaven with a wingspan of over two meters died in a nervous spasm with claws clasped, sitting on their heels with their wings outstretched and their heads bowed.

For us, this Saturday (February 6, 2021), one of the most drastic deaths of sea eagles, we solved a short distance from the manure in the middle of a fenced pasture for cattle under Velký Bor in the Klatovy region.
A place where few lay people come and a place where someone exports animal by-products (residues) from slaughterhouses to a pile of manure. However, this time someone poured poison (Carbofuran) over pockets, skins, feathers, poultry runners and other organic residues.
The birds, which also function as health police in nature and destroy mainly carcasses, then learned to walk here for the remains, and this is exactly what happened to them. Everyone took something from the pile of poisonous remains, and a particularly torturous death twisted them right after the first few bites.

The case was handed over to the Police of the Czech Republic for investigation, which, according to an autopsy and analysis of the content of elected dead predators and secured traps, then decides how the case will be classified and investigated.
Even today, however, I dare say that 99% of these are intentional crime, animal cruelty, illegal handling and use of toxic substances, unauthorized disposal of animal by-products, poaching and the killing of several specially protected and critically endangered animals! Moreover, in this area, unfortunately, this is far from an isolated case; similar cases have a tradition here.
Given the seriousness of the case and the damage caused, we are considering a financial reward for helping to clarify this case. In the meantime, however, we have to wait for the individual analyzes, the further course of the investigation and especially the opinion of the authorities that should deal with the case first by law. However, if someone already has specific knowledge about these cases today, we will be happy if you help us to clarify this massacre of rare predators. Thank you.

GT.. sorry I'm not familiar with czech!
Polly
Registered user
Posts: 3676
Joined: March 10th, 2018, 7:24 pm

Post by Polly »

March 2nd

Gift-Alarm in Wegberg – Vier tote Greifvögel im Tüschenbroicher Wald gefunden

https://www.komitee.de/de/aktuelles/pre ... -gefunden/

GT:
Poison alarm in Wegberg - four dead birds of prey found in the Tüschenbroich forest

"Wegberg. In and around the nature reserve (NSG) "Tüschenbroicher Wald" near Wegberg-Uevekoven, four dead birds of prey and suspected poison bait were found over the weekend. As reported by the Committee against Bird Murder, the strictly protected birds - three buzzards and a hawk - were reported by walkers and were recovered by experts from the association yesterday afternoon. “The hawk had a full crop, so it must have eaten something shortly before it died. The three buzzards were lying near a meat bait that gave off a clearly atypical chemical smell, ”reports ornithologist Marvin Fehn from the Committee against Bird Murder. ... "

"According to the committee, the current finds are not an isolated case, but are part of a whole series of criminal bird poisoning around the NSG Tüschenbroicher Wald, which dates back to 2008 and which have already killed dozens of animals. In March and April 2020 alone, four poisoned buzzards, another hawk, a dead pigeon prepared as bait and two chicken eggs treated with poison were found in the area. Laboratory tests have now confirmed that both the pigeon and the eggs were prepared with a prohibited, highly toxic insecticide that was later detected in the dead birds of prey. According to the committee, this is a neurotoxin from the carbamate group, which is also extremely dangerous for humans."

Image


Why ... . :unsure:
"Let nature be your teacher."
(William Wordsworth)
User avatar
Liz01
Registered user
Posts: 59469
Joined: January 21st, 2014, 2:06 pm
Location: Germany Ribnitz-Damgarten

Post by Liz01 »

White-tailed eagle presumably injured by wind turbine :sad:
Hamburg (dpa / lno) - According to the Hamburg environmental authority, a sea eagle was probably injured by a wind turbine in the port. Swan father Olaf Nieß saved the bird on Tuesday, said a spokesman. The eagle was operated on on Wednesday. "Unfortunately, you had to amputate part of the wing. We hope that the bird will get through," said Björn Marzahn, spokesman for the authorities.

"The bone was split a bit wider than we had hoped," added Nieß. It is 99 percent certain that the bird got caught in a wind turbine. It was located on the site of a metal processing plant in the Dradenau area under the wind turbines there.

At least the authorities were able to provide the sea eagle with suitable food. On Wednesday night the fishery inspector found seven men who illegally caught smelt on the Dove-Elbe in Neuengamme. They had already pulled several hundred kilos of fish from the river, it was said. The inspectors put the still viable smelt back into the water. Some of the rest were to serve as fresh food for the injured eagle.

With a wingspan of up to 2.40 meters, sea eagles are among the largest birds of prey in Central Europe. The animals are strictly protected by an EU directive. Several media had previously reported on the found of the injured eagle.

Image

https://www.hamburg.de/nachrichten-hamb ... -verletzt/

It was horrible to see that they showed the badly injured eagle on TV. they held him in the camera! :shock:

Polly, :hi: this thread is for White Tailed Eagles only .
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 110
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

There is a new study available on the following topic:
"Rodenticides in the environment pose threats to birds of prey" by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW)
You may find a short survey here:
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases ... 032321.php

Quote: "Evidence of rodenticides in white-tailed sea eagles demonstrated that scavengers occupying habitats more distant from human-modified landscapes are subjected to exposure as well.(...) "In white-tailed sea eagles we found rodenticides in almost 40 percent of our samples, at lower concentrations, whereas exposure in sparrowhawks and ospreys was low or zero."

Here's the link to the study:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... via%3Dihub

"Linking landscape composition and biological factors with exposure levels of rodenticides and agrochemicals in avian apex predators from Germany"
Authors: Alexander Badrya,Detlef Schenke,Gabriele Treu,Oliver Kronea

Although the study focuses on Germany - we all know there are no borders.
User avatar
Liz01
Registered user
Posts: 59469
Joined: January 21st, 2014, 2:06 pm
Location: Germany Ribnitz-Damgarten

Post by Liz01 »

Susanne wrote: May 12th, 2021, 2:55 pm There is a new study available on the following topic:
Susanne, thank you very much :2thumbsup:
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 110
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-norfolk-57023832

West Norfolk: Sea eagles set to return to second area in England

Published

3 days ago

White-tailed eagleimage copyrightWild Ken Hill
image captionThe white-tailed eagles reintroduced to the Isle of Wight have been spotted across England

White-tailed eagles are to be reintroduced to a second place in England and the first on the mainland.

Three pairs of the birds, also known as sea eagles, were released on the Isle of Wight in 2019 - 240 years after they were last recorded in the country.

Natural England has issued a licence to the Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation for a 10-year reintroduction at Wild Ken Hill in west Norfolk, starting in 2022.

The foundation said the birds would "fit into the landscape very well".

The eagles are the UK's largest bird of prey, with a wingspan of up to 8ft (2.5m).

They were once widespread across the UK, but were wiped out about a century ago.
Wild Ken Hillimage copyrightWild Ken Hill
image captionWild Ken Hill is a conservation and sustainable farming project on the west coast of Norfolk

A similar scheme in Scotland has proved a success with more than 130 breeding pairs.

The last known breeding pair in England was recorded at Culver Cliff on the Isle of Wight in 1780.

The Natural England licence will allow up to 60 juvenile birds to be released over a 10-year period, with the aim of establishing a small breeding population of six to 10 pairs in the region.
'Overwhelmed by support'

The eagles will come from Poland, where there are more than 1,000 pairs, but due to Covid-19 restrictions reintroduction will not begin until 2022.

Dominic Buscall, manager at Wild Ken Hill, said: "We are delighted to have the go-ahead to bring back white-tailed eagles to eastern England."

He said following a public consultation he was "overwhelmed by the support we have received from all sectors".
White-tailed eagleimage copyrightWild Ken HIll
image captionWhite-tailed eagles feed mainly on fish and water birds

Conservationist Roy Dennis said: "This is the next logical step to restore this magnificent bird to England and complements efforts across Europe to help the species."
'Positive contribution'

Falcons photographed in mid-air battle with kite
Flock of '140,000 birds' creates record at reserve
Wildlife project's beavers meet potential mates

Eagles from the Isle of Wight and from Europe have been spotted in Norfolk over the last year, which was one of the reasons the area was selected for the reintroduction.

It was also chosen because of its coastal location and quiet woodlands, which provide ideal nesting spots.

Dave Slater, from Natural England, said the project "makes a positive contribution to both people and wildlife".
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 110
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

https://www.fwi.co.uk/news/environment/ ... t-approved

Just found this in addition to the bbc-news-article:
Mixed reaction after Norfolk sea eagles project approved

Quote: "Attacks on livestock

NFU East Anglia environment adviser Rob Wise added: “The likely range of these birds is home to about half of the country’s outdoor-reared pigs and poultry, and also has a significant amount of sheep grazing.

“Farmers are worried that the sea eagles will prey on livestock, including lambs, piglets and free-range poultry. Many members are also concerned about the effect sea eagles will have on their conservation efforts.”

A project to reintroduce white-tailed eagles, also known as “sea eagles”, on the Isle of Wight began in 2019. The species has also been reintroduced to Scotland and Ireland in other projects.

Sheep farmers have reported cases of the eagles targeting their lambs."

Reminds me of the many discussions on wolves .....
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 110
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

And here's another one to complete the UK-section for today: :nod:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-hampshire-55996374

Isle of Wight sea eagle returns home after 17-month journey

Quote: "A white-tailed eagle which was reared by conservationists on the Isle of Wight has returned to the island after a 17-month journey across England.

The two-year-old male sea eagle flew 4,904km (3,047 miles), according to a tracker it wears.

It spent time in the North York Moors and Norfolk as well as settling with a group of red kites in Oxfordshire.

The Roy Dennis Wildlife Foundation, which released the bird as a juvenile, said its return was "exciting news". "

There is a fascinating graphic of the sea eagle's tracked flight course in the URL above!
User avatar
laranjeiras
Registered user
Posts: 3316
Joined: December 24th, 2012, 8:20 pm
Location: UK

Post by laranjeiras »

WTEs rescued on the Danube River

A great and happy story with interesting pictures, about how two WTEs were rescued...


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-europe-57358082

:2thumbsup:
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 110
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

https://www.izw-berlin.de/en/press-rele ... riods.html

Quote: "The white-tailed sea eagle is known for reacting sensitively to human disturbances. Forestry and agricultural activities are therefore restricted in the immediate vicinity of the nests. However, these seasonal protection periods are too short in the German federal States of Brandenburg (until August 31) and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (until July 31), as a new scientific analysis by a team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) suggests. Using detailed movement data of 24 juvenile white-tailed sea eagles with GPS transmitters, they were able to track when they fledge and when they leave the parental territory: on average, a good 10 and 23 weeks after hatching, respectively. When forestry work is allowed again, most of the young birds are still near the nest. In a publication in the journal “IBIS - International Journal of Avian Science”, the scientists therefore recommend an extension of the currently existing nest protection periods by one month."

see here: "Movement patterns of the White-tailed Sea Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla): post-fledging behaviour, natal dispersal onset and the role of the natal environment "

Marc Engler, Oliver Krone
First published: 26 May 2021
https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12967

Associate Editor: Kurt Burnham.
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 110
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

Update on avian influenza in Estonia:
June 09, 2021:
https://news.err.ee/1608241113/more-vir ... -countries

Quote: "The spring spread of the virus has not slowed down with the end of the spring nesting season, and outbreaks are also present in neighboring countries, particularly the highly pathogenic H5N8 and H5N1 strains, which have been detected in foxes in Holland and seals in the U.K. and Sweden.

"The latter strain was detected in May, in two sea eagle chicks found in Matsalu, and in birds, found dead in Pärnu County, Lääne and Ida-Viru counties last week," VTA spokesperson Hele-Mai Sammel said."

June 14,2021: I found this regarding our cases, and from the article

https://www.mesvaccins.net/web/news/175 ... en-estonie
I have extracted this link (World Organisation for Animal Health), in case you would like to know how theses cases are being dealt with:

https://wahis.oie.int/#/report-info?reportId=34500
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 110
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

https://www.rte.ie/news/regional/2021/0 ... ed-eagles/

21 white-tailed eagle chicks released into the wild across Munster

Quote: "Twenty-one white-tailed sea eagle chicks have been released into the wild across Munster as part of the second phase of programme to reintroduce the birds to the Irish ecosystem.

The birds were released at sites on the Shannon Estuary, at Lough Derg, in Co Waterford and in Killarney National Park.

The chicks were collected throughout the Trondheim area of Norway by the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research earlier this year."
Susanne
Registered user
Posts: 110
Joined: March 15th, 2019, 4:20 pm
Location: Langweid am Lech, Southern Germany

Post by Susanne »

New exhibition at Rostock Zoo:
https://www.zoo-rostock.de/ausstellunge ... -2020.html
Google translation: https://translate.google.com/translate? ... -2020.html
The winning photo shows - guess what?

Highlights of nature photography 2020
Quote: " “Highlight nature photographer 2020” is Markus Varesvuo from Finland with the image “Prey Flight”. The photo shows a sea eagle as it flies over the water with a fish as prey in its claws. There is a well-known place in Norway where ospreys are fed, and visitors can watch or take photos of them from a boat. One early evening in August, the photographer saw a mighty sea eagle sitting on a hill in the fjord from a boat; a touch of backlight illuminated him. When approaching the fish, Markus followed the eagle with his camera and pulled the trigger at the exact moment when the bird flew over the surface of the water with the fish it had just caught. At this point everything was right:the backlight of the setting sun on the plumage of the flying eagle, the reflections in the splashing water and the attitude of the animal - elements that give the captured image a special atmosphere."

More on the photographer, Markus Varesvuo, right here:
https://www.glanzlichter.com/template/i ... 947F32874E
Post Reply

Return to “The Haliaeetus Albicilla Collection”