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A White-tailed Eagle Database Project

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Liz01
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Post by Liz01 »

News from today
Eaglet ringed in Ahlbeck on May 31, 1993

Ringed on the Szczecin Lagoon 30 years ago – still there
Now he has created a sensation: what is probably the oldest sea eagle in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania has been identified in a picture. The animal was ringed in May 1993. “Sea eagles that are more than 25 years old are definitely among the very old birds

https://www.nordkurier.de/regional/ueck ... kt-2177664
Susanne
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Post by Susanne »

https://bnnbreaking.com/world/latvia/a- ... es-unfolds
Feb 27-2024:

A Decade of Drama Above: The Saga of Latvia's White-Tailed Eagles Unfolds

Quote: "Imagine a soap opera set not in the glittering metropolis but in the dense forests of Latvia, where the protagonists are not humans but majestic white-tailed eagles. This is not a figment of imagination but a reality chronicled by the Latvian Fund for Nature through a livestream of a nest in Durbe municipality, revealing an intricate tale of life, loss, and resilience."
Susanne
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Post by Susanne »

Gray Seal Spits Jet of Water at White-Tailed Eagle in Never Seen Before Encounter
Mar 7, 2024 by News Staff

https://www.sci.news/biology/gray-seal- ... 12747.html

Quote:"Clare Jacobs witnessed a white-tailed eagle swooping towards the water’s surface during a high tide.
As the eagle made its approach, an adult gray seal emerged from the water directly beneath the predator.
(...)
Captured on camera, the encounter showed the gray seal initially emitting barks of warning, but then resorting to the unprecedented defensive tactic spitting a stream of water directly at the eagle."
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Liz01
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Post by Liz01 »

In Eagles, lead-poisoned sea eagles are saved from death
In the "VisitErgli" profile of the "Tiktok" platform, Māris Olte shared a video of how a lead-poisoned sea eagle was found in the forest, which is probably a relative of the famous Durbes eagles.

The year of birth of the eagle could be 2016 or 2017.
After looking at the ring of the caught bird, the specialist makes a guess that this eagle is probably a relative of the famous Durbes eagles, whose nest can be watched online for ten years.

BTW: Janis K found the eagle!
https://www.tv3.lv/dzivesstils/dzivniek ... as-erglis/
Susanne
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Post by Susanne »

Belgium:
https://www.vrt.be/vrtnws/de/2024/03/15 ... dler-brut/
March 15, 2024
Quote:
"Breeding sea eagles in the De Blankaart nature reserve: “A first for our country”

Betty breeds in the nature reserve De Blankaart in Woumen (province of West Flanders, a town in the municipality of Diksmuide). Betty is the female of the sea eagle pair that has been there since April last year. It is the first time in hundreds of years that a pair of sea eagles has nested in Belgium."
-> Nice video footage included.
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Post by Susanne »

IMHO, a very good and substantial opinion on the death of of a WTE, shot in Roscommon, Ireland;
March 22, 2024
https://www.mayonews.ie/news/comment--- ... thers.html

OPINION: Undoing the work of others
Yet another of Ireland’s precious white-tailed sea eagles was shot and killed last week
Susanne
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Post by Susanne »

Sad news from North Rhine-Westphalia:
https://www1.wdr.de/nachrichten/rheinla ... n-100.html
<Google translator>
Quote.:
"Eagle from the only sea eagle nest in North Rhine-Westphalia found dead

As of: March 26, 2024, 5:32 p.m

It was a dramatic rescue operation at North Rhine-Westphalia's only sea eagle nest today in Xanten: the male was found dead, the offspring could be saved. The sea eagles had previously been extinct here for 200 years.

It actually looked like a successful start to the sea eagle breeding season. Bird watchers were regularly able to observe the pair at the nest and during courtship displays. The male sea eagle was under special observation because it was equipped with a satellite transmitter as a young animal by researchers in the Netherlands.

Sea eagle found dead in field

The birdwatchers sounded the alarm today because the tracking signal was always registered from the same place.
The Bislicher Insel nature reserve between Ginderich and Xanten is a floodplain landscape that was created by changes in the course of the Rhine.
According to the Ruhr regional association, a search operation began immediately. A spokesman confirmed to WDR that the male sea eagle was found dead in a field near the town of Alpen.
(...)
A chick and an egg rescued

Because experts believe the surviving female cannot look after the brood alone, a rescue operation was launched today. Conservationists used a ladder to reach the nest, which is several meters high. According to the RVR , a live chick and an egg were recovered from it. The offspring were handed over to experts at a breeding station in Bocholt."

Cause of the male WTE's death yet unknown.
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Post by Susanne »

Ranging Behavior of Non-Breeding and Breeding Adult White-Tailed Eagles
by Paweł Mirski and Dariusz Anderwald
Diversity 2023, 15(12), 1208; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15121208

https://www.mdpi.com/1424-2818/15/12/1208
Quote:
"Abstract
Space utilization by animals is vital for species ecology but also a valuable predictor of habitat conditions and environment capacity for a given species. We investigated the ranging behavior of the white-tailed eagle, an apex predator experiencing a significant population increase and saturation. Comparing five adult floaters and two breeding males tracked with GPS loggers in Poland for 1–5 years, we observed substantial differences in space utilization. Breeding males occupied approximately 63 to 122 km2 (using 90% kernel density), while floaters ranged over roughly 6000 to 60,000 km2. Breeding males expanded their home ranges during successful breeding, with one male frequently flying 29 km to a foraging site when raising chicks but hardly doing so in other seasons. Both breeding males revisited nests more frequently in April and May (up to seven times daily, typically two to four), exhibiting distinct seasonal daily movement patterns. Floaters had slightly higher daily movement rates with a weak seasonal pattern. We conclude that breeding males’ ranging behavior depended on proximity to optimal foraging sites, while adult floaters engaged in prolonged wandering."
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Post by Susanne »

https://movementecologyjournal.biomedce ... ticle-info

Penttinen, I., Nebel, C., Stjernberg, T. et al. Large-scale genotypic identification reveals density-dependent natal dispersal patterns in an elusive bird of prey. Mov Ecol 12, 16 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40462-023-00447-5

Published 15 February 2024

Quote:
"Abstract
Background

Natal dispersal, the distance between site of birth and site of first breeding, has a fundamental role in population dynamics and species’ responses to environmental changes. Population density is considered a key driver of natal dispersal. However, few studies have been able to examine densities at both the natal and the settlement site, which is critical for understanding the role of density in dispersal. Additionally, the role of density on natal dispersal remains poorly understood in long-lived and slowly reproducing species, due to their prolonged dispersal periods and often elusive nature. We studied the natal dispersal of the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) in response to local breeder densities. We investigated the effects of the number of active territories around the natal site on (a) natal dispersal distance and (b) the difference between natal and settlement site breeder density. We were interested in whether eagles showed tendencies of conspecific attraction (positive density-dependence) or intraspecific competition (negative density-dependence) and how this related to settlement site breeder density."
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Post by Susanne »

Survival, Nest Site Affiliation and Post-Fledging Movements of Danish White-Tailed Eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla)
by Daniel Palm Eskildsen, Nina Yasmin Ali, Jonas Colling Larsen, Kasper Thorup. Kim Skelmose and Anders P. Totrupp
Published: 23 May 2024
Diversity 2024, 16(6), 314; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16060314
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecology and Conservation of the White-Tailed Eagle and Golden Eagle)

https://www.mdpi.com/1424-2818/16/6/314

Quote:
"Abstract
The early life movement patterns of long-lived, large raptors, such as the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), remain largely unexplored. In this study, we have tracked 22 individuals of white-tailed eagles hatched in Denmark to investigate key parameters, including survival rates, causes of death, nest site fidelity, geographical distribution, and dispersal behaviors. Our analyses are based on approximately 340,000 GPS/GSM telemetry positions from the 22 individuals. We found that survival rates were lower in the first year of life, especially among females, but increased in subsequent years. The primary causes of death were wind turbine collisions and avian influenza. Movement analyses revealed that juvenile eagles frequented nest sites in August and September, with females showing earlier exploratory flights and dispersal. Both males and females spent most of their first calendar year near their nest sites. In the second calendar year, a significant proportion of their time was spent at well-known white-tailed eagle resting areas in Denmark, as well as visiting neighboring countries. Notably, one individual set a new distance record for a Danish GPS-tagged white-tailed eagle, venturing at least 1750 km away from its nest site to visit Sweden, Finland, Russia, and Norway. Our results, indicating that juvenile white-tailed eagles continue to utilize nest sites into September, suggest an extension of the recommended time period for nest protection zones provided by BirdLife Denmark (DOF)."
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